The Epiclesis and Magic Ritual

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I just ran across an interesting reference to the “epiclesis” or the coming down or summoning of the spirits in theurgic, Chaldean as well as other magic rituals.

I know that this “epiclesis” is common in the East was introduced into the Novus Ordo.

I am not implying that this is epiclesis is necessarily a magic ritual introduced into the Novus Ordo or present in the East via assimilation of magic ritual.

However, the parallel with magic ritual does intrigue me.

Does anyone know the origin of how the epiclesis entered the Novus Ordo and what the role of the epiclesis is in the Divine Liturgy in Orthdoxy?

If so, please respond in the comments.

Thanks.

UFOs and Chaldean Magic

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Just a brief note on something I read from the ancient Babylonian text, the Chaldean Oracles.

A description of the “conjuring of Hecate” says that the magus will see “either a fire like a child, stretched over the vortex of the air, or a formless fire, from which a voice rushes forth, or an abundant light, rumbling spiral wise around a field.”

This fiery apparition of summoned demons sounds a lot like UFO phenomena that has been recorded en mass–especially in the 21st century: the majority of the “UFO’s” are fiery spiraling lights.

If some of these lights are not advanced military craft and are, in fact, demons who is summoning them?

Maybe “Lord” Rothschild knows

 

The “God” of Praise and Worship

 

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Dear Reader,

I have been reading a work on the Chaldean Oracles, the work that is the basis of most of Western magic–especially Neoplatonic magic and theurgy.

One curious elements I have come across in the work  (and in all of my student of Neoplatonic magic and Gnosticism, in fact) is that Neoplatonism, theurgy, and Gnosticism all use images and words that are similarly used by Christians. “Father,” “Heavenly Father,” “Father of Lights,” etc.

However, these titles, when used in pagan prayer, clearly refer to other demons or Satan himself, not the Most Holy Trinity.

Why?

First of all, because Neoplatonists are not offering The Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass when worshiping but rather are practicing shamanic rituals that induce possession and ecstasy.

Secondly, these pagan services include worship of other gods and daemons as well.

Finally, Gnosticism and theurgy have been repeatedly condemned by the Church as demonic.

However, if it is possible to use “Christian” names for God and even the name of Jesus (as New Agers do), in self-identified pagan worship, then it is also possible that the “Jesus,” “Father of Lights,” and even “Holy Spirit” invoked at self-identified Christian worship, which is actually a contemporary form of shamanism and theurgy, is actually demonic worship.

It is my contention that such rituals take place during “praise and worship” festivals that use the name of Jesus and other holy names of God but are actually worship of demons.

I have already written that praise and worship ceremonies clearly resemble Gnostic rituals. However, even the magic ceremonies of the Chaldeans included such things as “enchanting songs” and “ineffable words” (praying in tongues?) that induced “prophets” to speak in prophesy by summoning spirits.

This sounds a lot like praise and worship ceremonies in which the “Holy Spirit” (or more likely the demon called Apollo by the Greeks and Romans) is conjured through Evangelical praise music and a sweaty, narcissistic charismatic begins to babel and tell the people words of consolation in the form of “prophecy”–remember the demons have no problem telling the people super nice and affirming things.

Is this how the Holy Spirit works? Can He be conjured by a layman and to come and reveal New Age platitudes?

 

 

 

Our Lady and the Triumph over Hecate

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One of the more famous churches in Rome is a former temple dedicated to Athena or Minerva, which has been converted to a Catholic church titled “Maria sopra Minerva” or Mary over Minerva, celebrating Our Lady’s victory of the degenerate pagan goddess Athena.

While I had known that Our Lady was presented by early Christians as superior to the various goddesses that were venerated in the Mediterranean world, I was not aware of how great a contrast Our Lady has to the goddess Hecate–especially as read in the tradition of Neoplatonic magic.

Like Artemis-Diana with whom she is linked, Hecate, the goddess of the underworld and witchcraft was linked with the moon. She further had snake hair (a Gnostic symbol) and was adorned by fiery snakes. Finally, and most interestingly, Hecate was an image of the world soul, the “membrane” between the intellectual-spiritual world and the physical world. Thus, there is the connection with magic and witchcraft as those who mediated the power of Hecate could mediate between the spiritual and physical world, summoning demons and powers.

As a result, Hecate is a demonic mediatrix, a diabolical mockery of Our Lady.

Finally, it is weird how common the image of the veil or membrane between the spiritual and physical world is in everything from faerie tales with magic mirrors (remade by Walt Disney); to the Early Modern Chinese novel, The Journey to the West, to the poetry of Percy Shelley; to Stephen Spielberg’s 80s film, Poltergeist.

In fact, Hecate’s function sounds a lot like the screens of electronic devices that mediate the demonic world of the internet into our homes.

Our Lady of Guadalupe, Pray for us.

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Orpheus as Shaman, Mage, Artist, and Scientist

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One of the dominant ideas of Renaissance Neoplatonism and contemporary occultism is the belief that that prior to Plato there was a tradition of magi that included Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Zororaster in which a theological tradition was passed down called the prisca theologia.

While one might readily dismiss this idea as ridiculous fantasizing, several professional scholars have written on the idea that these mystery teachings do, in fact, crop up in Aristotle.

The father of this tradition was allegedly Orpheus whose myth has a number of shamanistic and magic elements in it, including the following:

  1. A marriage that was never consummated with Eurydice, his wife.
  2. A serpent that stings Eurydice (a memory of the serpent in the Garden of Eden)?
  3. A descent to the underworld and power via music over the demons in the underworld.
  4. The failure to bring his wife from the underworld.
  5. The power to enchant nature and animals and plants to do his bidding via ritual music.
  6. The creation of pederasty and sodomy (as possibly a cultic ritual) after failing to retrieve his wife.
  7. His own death and dismemberment and prophesied future resurrection by women who desired him (human sacrifice?)

All of these elements would later serve as the basis of later Western magic up until the present day.

Interestingly, in French cave paintings, this “Orpheus” shaman shows up as a shape changer (possibly a constellation) associated with animals and phallic activity as well as music (I could not find the cave painting of the musical shaman).

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Pederasty: The Missing Element of the Neoplatonic Movement

 

Dear Reader,

I have discovered a gold mine of information regarding Neoplatonism in the Renaissance in a collection of essays titled Marsilio Ficino: His Theology, His Philosophy, His Legacy. 

Before I share one of them, I want to make a couple of quick statements. First of all, I have no specific evidence outside of rumor or hearsay that anyone involved in the dissemination of Neoplatonism in Europe in the 15th or 16th century (including the Medici in the picture above!) engaged in sodomy, pederasty or any other degenerate behavior outside of John Dee’s famous wife swap and rumors of Giordano Bruno’s visits to prostitutes.

As far as I can tell, all of them followed traditional Christian moral teaching in regard to sins of the flesh.

Secondly, on this blog, I am by no means suggesting that everyone who utilized Plato or Neoplatonic teaching was an occultist or a heretic. In fact, I think that much of what is said by Plato and the Neoplatonists in regard to metaphysics, ethics, and even some politics is basically correct in as much as it harmonizes with traditional Catholic teaching.

Nonetheless, it is my view that Neoplatonism also provides the basis for Gnosticism or intellectual Satanism and “high magic.”

Furthermore, one of the essential ingredients of this magic is pederasty and sodomy, which flourished at one time among Socrates and his fellows and was revived in the 19th century among Plato scholars and of course practiced by Aleister Crowley and later sexual degenerates and occultists.

It was thus of some interest when I read Arthur Field’s’ sarcastic comment in regard to James Hankins’s misreading of one of Marsilio Ficino’s letters: “I would conclude from Hankins’s argument that Ficino was running some pederastic club for visiting ambassadors.”

Again, I have absolutely no evidence that Ficino was a pedophile or sodomite, but Fields’s sarcastic comment is worth probing.

Florence was known for its degeneracy and the presence of pederasty long after Dante’s famous depiction of sodomites in hell in the fourteenth century.

Pederasty was also clearly one of the steps in the ascent of love in the Symposium and Phaedrus–especially in the esoteric readings of the works as magical ascents.

Are we to believe that the arrival of Plato was greeted with only intellectual admiration in the West, and no one attempted to imitate the degeneracy promoted in the “erotic dialogues”?

Were those who revived Gnosticism, Satanism, and Neoplatonic magic, and conversing with demons really living chaste lives?

I am not making any accusations, but this issue deserves further study.

 

 

 

“Sing a New Song Unto the Lord”: Gnosticism and Praise and Worship

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We be worshiping Isis up in here

Dear Reader,

I just came across an interesting tidbit on Gnostics: apparently the heretical Christian sect, engaged in “the recitation of communal exercise…meant to produce mass ecstasy.”

I had previously believed that the only people engaged in ecstatic chanting and singing in the ancient world would be found at Dionysian rituals, but it is interesting to note that the Gnostics engaged in such activity as well.

What is important in all of this is that the Christians were NOT engaged in singing hymns that were meant to produce ecstasy as some charismatic Christians claim today. Rather, it was the pagans who summoned spirits to put them in ecstatic trances.

This is not the method of singing to the only Ultimately and Ever-living God.

This is: