Manly P. Hall, Ronald Reagan, and John Paul II (A Shocking Revelation).

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Throughout his work, A Pope and A President: John Paul II, Ronald Reagan, and the Extraordinary Story of the 20th Century, in which he¬†attempts to seize the message of Fatima and use it as post-Cold War American imperial propaganda, Paul Kengor repeatedly refers to the phrase “Divine Plan” or “DP,” which was regularly used by Ronald Reagan, his staff, and according to Kengor, John Paul II himself during their intrigues against the Soviet Union.

As even mainstream secular journals admit, it is well known¬†that Ronald Reagan was an avid reader of the works of Manley P. Hall, the high ranking Free Masonic occultist who envisioned the creation of America as a product of millennia of conspiracy on behalf of secret societies. These secret societies aimed to create a world republic using America as a vehicle. Manly P. Hall called these efforts “The Great Plan.”

Sounds a lot like “Divine Plan,” doesn’t it?

We are thus, again, left in a strange situation with some troubling questions.

  1. Did John Paul II really believe in a Divine Plan or Great Plan in which America would bring about an occult world republic? Is this what John Paul meant by the New Spring Time of Evangelization (a term derived form the occult) and New Advent (advent of whom? Christ has already come!?).
  2. If not, does this reference to Hall give us a key to understanding the neocons’ infiltration of the Church and their attempt to coral her in the service of American imperialism? Are/were Kengor, Weigel, Novak, Fr. Neuhaus (and others) part of some organization that is working toward the Great Plan?
  3. What is going on here?

What the CIA Thought about Mehmet Ali Agca.

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One of the interesting revelations of Paul Kengor’s book The Pope and the President is that William J. Casey, Ronald Reagan’s head of the CIA, had to fight against the institutional Central Intelligence Agency to push the narrative that Soviet intelligence was involved in the assassination attempt on John Paul II. Furthermore, Kengor himself was rebuffed by CIA men when he proposed the theory, and as Kengor reveals, the CIA even went out of its way to attack Claire Sterling, the journalist who first proposed the Soviet connection in Reader’s Digest.

Of course, there is evidence of collaboration between elements of American and Soviet governmental bodies during the Cold War. Was there collusion in the attempt on John Paul II’s life? Or was it just a rock the CIA did not want to turn over?

This dismissal of Agca by the Central Intelligence Agency leaves us with some interesting questions.

  1. Why is the narrative of Soviet involvement in the attempt so important to Catholic neocons?
  2. Why would the CIA so vehemently deny the involvement of the KGB or any other intelligence agency in the attempt?
  3. Was Agca working for someone else outside the main channels of Soviet or American intelligence?

Paul Kengor and the Neocon Version of the Consecration of Russia.

 

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Dear Reader,

I have finished Paul Kengor’s book, A Pope and a President, which seeks to reboot the good ol’ days of neoconservative Catholicism that began in the Reagan era and climaxed with the reigns of George W. Bush and John Paul II. One the books main theses is that the message of Fatima was fulfilled in the struggle between atheistic communism and American liberalism. American liberalism triumphs in the end, and Russia is “converted” not to Catholicism but to a form of government that more closely resembles Western democracy.

One of the apexes of this triumph of liberalism (again NOT Christianity) is in Pope John Paul II’s meeting with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev on December 1, 1989. Kengor makes special effort to show that Gorbachev was “a closet Christian” whose liberalization of the Soviet Union ultimately was the catalyst for the “conversion” of Russia, and Kengor’s depiction of John Paul’s meeting with Gorbachev three weeks after the fall of the Berlin Wall is especially curious. According to Kengor, John Paul II was adamant that Russia accept “fundamental human rights” as well as “freedom of conscience, from which stems religious freedom.” John Paul even argued for freedom of conscience for “…Baptists, Protestants, Jews, as well as Muslims.”

Gorbachev responded positively, explaining that “freedom of conscience and religion” was connected to perestroika, or the liberalization of Soviet society.

Kengor describes the rest of their conversation as a mild debate over moral relativism versus objective moral values.

What we get from this meeting and Kengor’s description of it is especially interesting. Kengor is suggesting that perestroika was part of Our Lady’s plan of converting Russia not to a Catholic country but to a liberal country that allowed freedom of religion and conscience.

We also get a glimpse into John Paul II’s humanist thinking, which seems (at least in this scene) to be very concerned with liberal rights and less concerned with the salvation and conversion of souls.

It is clear that the neocons are desperate to seize the message of Fatima away from groups like the Fatima Center and traditional Catholics and fit it into their own narrative of the triumph of liberalism and not the Social Reign of Christ the King.

Our Lady of Fatima, Pray for us.