The Epiclesis and Magic Ritual

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I just ran across an interesting reference to the “epiclesis” or the coming down or summoning of the spirits in theurgic, Chaldean as well as other magic rituals.

I know that this “epiclesis” is common in the East was introduced into the Novus Ordo.

I am not implying that this is epiclesis is necessarily a magic ritual introduced into the Novus Ordo or present in the East via assimilation of magic ritual.

However, the parallel with magic ritual does intrigue me.

Does anyone know the origin of how the epiclesis entered the Novus Ordo and what the role of the epiclesis is in the Divine Liturgy in Orthdoxy?

If so, please respond in the comments.

Thanks.

The Devil’s Insistence on Strict Adherence to Magical Ritual

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Dear Reader,

While paganism and its modern incarnation in the New Age movement is known for its flexibility and openness to variations in worship and ritual, I found something very interesting when reading about the Chaldean Oracles.

The demon of the oracles who calls himself “God” demands that the rituals be done absolutely correctly or this “God” will lead the magus down “the wrong path,” i.e. mislead him or her.

This is a very interesting tidbit, and it reminds me of something I saw one time.

I remember watching the beginning of a black mass performed by Anton Lavey (aka Howard Stanton Levey!) in a Protestant documentary on how degenerate and Satanic Hollywood is.

What I found especially curious about Lavey’s black mass (I quickly fast-forward through it and would strongly recommend against watching it!) was that it was in Latin, ad orientem, and a deliberate mockery of the Traditional Latin Mass not the Novus Ordo.

Thus,  the devil demands a strict adherence to his diabolical rituals which are a mockery of the Mass of the Ages not the Mass of Paul VI.

The devil often mocks God while simultaneously attempting to ape God’s magnificent designs. God demanded strict, exact observance of the detailed commands he gave to the Israelite people for worship, and the Most Holy Catholic Church has (until the 1960s) had a similar emphasis on slavish attention to detail in worship (and in doctrine).

Thus the modernist theology and the modernist mass with their loosey goosey approach are a special breed of evil and almost “sub-Satanic” form of degeneracy  that do not even match the standards of the wicked practitioners of the occult.

UFOs and Chaldean Magic

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Just a brief note on something I read from the ancient Babylonian text, the Chaldean Oracles.

A description of the “conjuring of Hecate” says that the magus will see “either a fire like a child, stretched over the vortex of the air, or a formless fire, from which a voice rushes forth, or an abundant light, rumbling spiral wise around a field.”

This fiery apparition of summoned demons sounds a lot like UFO phenomena that has been recorded en mass–especially in the 21st century: the majority of the “UFO’s” are fiery spiraling lights.

If some of these lights are not advanced military craft and are, in fact, demons who is summoning them?

Maybe “Lord” Rothschild knows

 

The “God” of Praise and Worship

 

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Dear Reader,

I have been reading a work on the Chaldean Oracles, the work that is the basis of most of Western magic–especially Neoplatonic magic and theurgy.

One curious elements I have come across in the work  (and in all of my student of Neoplatonic magic and Gnosticism, in fact) is that Neoplatonism, theurgy, and Gnosticism all use images and words that are similarly used by Christians. “Father,” “Heavenly Father,” “Father of Lights,” etc.

However, these titles, when used in pagan prayer, clearly refer to other demons or Satan himself, not the Most Holy Trinity.

Why?

First of all, because Neoplatonists are not offering The Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass when worshiping but rather are practicing shamanic rituals that induce possession and ecstasy.

Secondly, these pagan services include worship of other gods and daemons as well.

Finally, Gnosticism and theurgy have been repeatedly condemned by the Church as demonic.

However, if it is possible to use “Christian” names for God and even the name of Jesus (as New Agers do), in self-identified pagan worship, then it is also possible that the “Jesus,” “Father of Lights,” and even “Holy Spirit” invoked at self-identified Christian worship, which is actually a contemporary form of shamanism and theurgy, is actually demonic worship.

It is my contention that such rituals take place during “praise and worship” festivals that use the name of Jesus and other holy names of God but are actually worship of demons.

I have already written that praise and worship ceremonies clearly resemble Gnostic rituals. However, even the magic ceremonies of the Chaldeans included such things as “enchanting songs” and “ineffable words” (praying in tongues?) that induced “prophets” to speak in prophesy by summoning spirits.

This sounds a lot like praise and worship ceremonies in which the “Holy Spirit” (or more likely the demon called Apollo by the Greeks and Romans) is conjured through Evangelical praise music and a sweaty, narcissistic charismatic begins to babel and tell the people words of consolation in the form of “prophecy”–remember the demons have no problem telling the people super nice and affirming things.

Is this how the Holy Spirit works? Can He be conjured by a layman and to come and reveal New Age platitudes?

 

 

 

A Brief Note on Synesius and the Chaldean Oracles

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Dear Reader,

As I have noted before, the earlier Catholic bishop Synesius was an adept of Neoplatonic magic and Gnostic thought. However, I have just discovered that he uses terminology used in the ur-text of Western magic, the Chaldean Oracles. The Oracles were originally from Babylon and are the basis of much of Western magic and occultism–especially the “thinking man’s” magic.

Synesius’s familiarity with this ancient Babylonian text is strange and could further lead to the idea that occultists hid out among the earlier Christian clergy and passed down their teaching sub rosa.