The Epiclesis and Magic Ritual

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I just ran across an interesting reference to the “epiclesis” or the coming down or summoning of the spirits in theurgic, Chaldean as well as other magic rituals.

I know that this “epiclesis” is common in the East was introduced into the Novus Ordo.

I am not implying that this is epiclesis is necessarily a magic ritual introduced into the Novus Ordo or present in the East via assimilation of magic ritual.

However, the parallel with magic ritual does intrigue me.

Does anyone know the origin of how the epiclesis entered the Novus Ordo and what the role of the epiclesis is in the Divine Liturgy in Orthdoxy?

If so, please respond in the comments.

Thanks.

UFOs and Chaldean Magic

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Just a brief note on something I read from the ancient Babylonian text, the Chaldean Oracles.

A description of the “conjuring of Hecate” says that the magus will see “either a fire like a child, stretched over the vortex of the air, or a formless fire, from which a voice rushes forth, or an abundant light, rumbling spiral wise around a field.”

This fiery apparition of summoned demons sounds a lot like UFO phenomena that has been recorded en mass–especially in the 21st century: the majority of the “UFO’s” are fiery spiraling lights.

If some of these lights are not advanced military craft and are, in fact, demons who is summoning them?

Maybe “Lord” Rothschild knows

 

The “God” of Praise and Worship

 

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Dear Reader,

I have been reading a work on the Chaldean Oracles, the work that is the basis of most of Western magic–especially Neoplatonic magic and theurgy.

One curious elements I have come across in the work  (and in all of my student of Neoplatonic magic and Gnosticism, in fact) is that Neoplatonism, theurgy, and Gnosticism all use images and words that are similarly used by Christians. “Father,” “Heavenly Father,” “Father of Lights,” etc.

However, these titles, when used in pagan prayer, clearly refer to other demons or Satan himself, not the Most Holy Trinity.

Why?

First of all, because Neoplatonists are not offering The Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass when worshiping but rather are practicing shamanic rituals that induce possession and ecstasy.

Secondly, these pagan services include worship of other gods and daemons as well.

Finally, Gnosticism and theurgy have been repeatedly condemned by the Church as demonic.

However, if it is possible to use “Christian” names for God and even the name of Jesus (as New Agers do), in self-identified pagan worship, then it is also possible that the “Jesus,” “Father of Lights,” and even “Holy Spirit” invoked at self-identified Christian worship, which is actually a contemporary form of shamanism and theurgy, is actually demonic worship.

It is my contention that such rituals take place during “praise and worship” festivals that use the name of Jesus and other holy names of God but are actually worship of demons.

I have already written that praise and worship ceremonies clearly resemble Gnostic rituals. However, even the magic ceremonies of the Chaldeans included such things as “enchanting songs” and “ineffable words” (praying in tongues?) that induced “prophets” to speak in prophesy by summoning spirits.

This sounds a lot like praise and worship ceremonies in which the “Holy Spirit” (or more likely the demon called Apollo by the Greeks and Romans) is conjured through Evangelical praise music and a sweaty, narcissistic charismatic begins to babel and tell the people words of consolation in the form of “prophecy”–remember the demons have no problem telling the people super nice and affirming things.

Is this how the Holy Spirit works? Can He be conjured by a layman and to come and reveal New Age platitudes?

 

 

 

Julian the Apostate and Theurgic Magic

Julian the Apostate is often upheld as a beacon of Greek rationalism and tolerance resisting the flood of superstitious Christianity.

However, as John P. Anton notes in his article “Theourgia-Demiourgia: A Controversial Issue in Hellenistic Thought and Religion,” Julian was primarily interested in replacing Christianity not with a highly rationalistic Platonism or Aristotelianism but with a magical Neoplatonism. In fact, he was warned by Christians like Eusebius to avoid the company of wizards.

Moreover, Anton notes that Julian learned his magic from his “education in Athenian Neoplatonism.” What we see here is that the Platonic Academy was teaching magic not rationalist and agnostic Platonism.

Thus, when Christians would later expel the Platonic Academy, it was done in order remove the practice of magic not to get rid of philosophy.

Perhaps the biggest question is where this magic teaching went when it was suppressed by Christian emperors.

I wonder if Alexander Dugin knows….

Neoplatonism, Theurgy, Gnosticism and Charismatic Babbling

 

It is common knowledge among scholars of Neoplatonism that the magical process of theurgy or literally “god working” was practiced by the NeoPlatonic philosopher Iamblichus. However, it is often forgotten that this process was derived from the Chaldean Oracles, a series of mysterious texts commenting on an ancient Babylon mystical poem (yes, reader there is a connection with the Kabbalah and Talmud).

What’s more as Dylan Burns points out in his work Apocalypse of the Alien God, theurgy was also practiced by gnostics. Dylan notes some of the characteristics of theurgy:

  1. Alphabet mysticism
  2. Purification
  3. Hymns
  4. Prayers
  5. Animation of statues (interestingly a common theme of horror movies, actual demonic possession, and there is a clear link with AI and robotics here)
  6. Possession
  7. Conjuring of spirits
  8. Mystical contemplation

What is especially interesting is that one of the marks of gnostic theurgy was what more rational Neoplatonists like Plotinus called “meaningless babbling.” This babbling included all kinds of ecstatic praise of “God” as well as gods and demons and was meant to induce a communal ecstasy during gnostic rituals.

This, my friends, sounds a lot like praise and worship and the charismatic movement.

True Christian worship is always calm and contemplative, and if there is any ecstatic activity, it is instituted by God not by the one in prayer.

When a worshipper conjures the ecstatic feeling him or herself, it is called magic.

Reflections on Some Traits of Theurgy

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Dear Reader,

I recently been probing the ancient pre-Socratic pedigree of a Neoplatonic magic, also known as theurgy, or “god-working.” In his work, Ancient Philosophy, Mystery, and Magic, Peter Kingsley gives a few traits of theurgy that have roots in the magic allegedly practiced by the pre-Socratic philosopher Empedocles. The traits are as follows:

  1. Control over the weather.
  2. Visions of gods in a glass, mirror, or by some other means.
  3. The use of magic amulets and symbols.
  4. The obtainment of immortality via magic after a process of death and rebirt

It is interesting to see how modern technology has the same traits.

  1. Weather modification via chem trails, cloud seeding, etc.
  2. Virtual reality, television, the internet, and AI.
  3. The proliferation of occult symbols in pop culture.
  4. The drive for immortality and the possible of resuscitation via cryogenic freezing

It is almost as if there is a 3000 year+ old occult tradition that has now finally broken free from the restrains of Christianity…